Healthy Eating > apps > EMW > Program Planner

Teaching the Program

Program Philosophy

Eat Move Win is a nutrition course that includes a Physical Education component that makes the connections between physical activity and nutritious eating. The program applies nutrition knowledge to facilitate positive eating behaviors.

Program Planner

Behavior change is more effectively accomplished over a longer period of time, so if your situation allows teaching 1 or 2 lessons per week, that’s the ideal. Begin with options for Knowledge Gains and Applications. Then add Extensions as time allows. Lessons utilize a 5E* structure and will be most effective when taught in order. 

Lessons have been developed with a 50-minute class period in mind. Lesson 1 will take longer than 50 minutes due to the extra time needed to get students logged in and to play the Kahoot game. Time-saving ideas include: 

  • Assign the Health Alert as pre-work for class discussion along with the Backstory
  • Self-Survey food and activity logs can be kept on an ongoing basis instead of during class time.

Download Teacher Support All Lessons or review lesson by lesson support found below.

Lesson-by-Lesson Support

The Before Lesson tab for each lesson includes:

  • Evidence of Student Learning statements 
  • Background information to refresh your content knowledge
  • Listing of URLs needed by both students and teachers to ensure availability 
  • Alignment with
    • Health Education Content Standards for California Schools 
    • Physical Education Model Content Standards for California Schools
    • CCSS Anchor Standards for Science, History, and Technical Subjects 

The Teacher View tab for each part of the lesson includes:

  • Teaching tips
  • Resources for class discussion and content presentation and clarification
  • Extend Explorations on various related topics

Student Grouping

Many of the learning experiences in Eat Move Win can be carried out effectively by pairs or small groups. However, the Self-Surveys and many of the Apply It features should be carried out by individuals to maintain personal privacy. Evaluate the interpersonal dynamics of your students to create successful groups and look ahead to the nature of any given learning experience with privacy issues in mind. 

Use of Electronic Devices 

Nearly every aspect of Eat Move Win has been optimized for small screen viewing. So students can log onto desktop computers or use tablets or smartphones. Nooks are not supported at this time. Of note, students need to log in individually for the lesson quizzes for individual scores to be generated. 

Journals or Notebooks 

Students will be more successful if they utilize a journal or notebook in which to record their ideas and keep their materials. Logs and other recording sheets can be downloaded, edited if desired, and printed or uploaded to the school’s server or a cloud service such as Google Docs. 

No or Limited Access to Electronic Devices 

While all of the content of Eat Move Win lives on the Internet, you can use the unit with little or no access to electronic devices for students. However, you would need a projector or interactive white board. Download the No Device Guide for detailed instructions on how to teach students without a device.

Materials supporting core student objectives that can be downloaded and printed for student use include: 

  • Health Alert and Backstory for Lessons 1–4
  • Self-Survey Daily Food and Activity Log 
  • Various Investigate resources 
  • Various Sharpen Skills resources 
  • Quizzes for Lessons 1–4 

* The BSCS 5E Instructional Model: Origins, Effectiveness and Applications

Students examine food groups and how to classify foods into food groups.

Vocabulary:

  • MyPlate
  • calories
  • nutrient
  • empty-calorie foods

Evidence of Student Learning

Students will know:

  • How to classify foods into food groups or as empty-calorie foods
  • Nutritional comparisons between food-group foods and empty-calorie foods

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze personal food logs and identify under-consumed food groups
  • Identify a potential behavior change related to food-group foods and empty-calorie foods
Knowledge Gains

Health Alert: What's Your Eating Style

  • Nutrition knowledge pre-assessment 
  • MyPlate video 
  • Introduces nutrition and contrasts food groups and empty-calorie foods

Investigate: Classifying Foods

  • Comparisons of food-group foods and empty-calorie foods in terms of nutrition and examples of each

Chart Progress and Chart Progress Teacher View

  • 10-question multiple-choice auto-graded quiz
Applications

Explore: Self-Survey

  • Prompts personal food and activity logs and guides reflection

Investigate: Classifying Foods—Apply It

  • Apply new learning to food log analysis

Sharpen Skills: Name That Food Group

  • Identify food groups represented in mixed dishes
Potential Behavior Change

Chart Progress: Change for the Better

  • Students become aware of the kinds of foods they consume and ways to include more nutritious foods.
Extensions

Investigate Teacher View: Extend Exploration—Daily Physical Activity and Energy

  • Option for student research into the connection between physical activity and nutrition

 

Vocabulary:

  • nutrition
  • calorie
  • metabolism

Evidence of Student Learning

Students will know:

  • The difference between food portions and actual serving sizes
  • How to estimate serving sizes for their calorie needs

Students will be able to:

  • Estimate recommended serving sizes using their hands
  • Analyze personal food logs and identify appropriate portion sizes
  • Identify a potential behavior change related to portions and serving sizes
Knowledge Gains

Health Alert: Tracking American Weight Trends with Backstory

  • Introduces national weight trends
  • Relates calories to activity
  • Introduces nutrition and contrasts food groups and empty-calorie foods

Investigate: Hand to Mouth

  • Identify serving sizes of foods and total number of recommended servings for calorie level from each food group

Chart Progress and Chart Progress Teacher View

  • 10-question multiple-choice auto-graded quiz
Applications

Explore: Self-Survey

  • Prompts personal food and activity logs and guides reflection

Investigate: Classifying Foods—Apply It

  • Apply new learning to food log analysis

Sharpen Skills: Trade Up

  • Strategies and examples for trading up empty-calorie foods for food-group foods
Potential Behavior Change

Chart Progress: Change for the Better

  • Students become aware of the kinds of foods they consume and trade up empty-calorie foods.
Extensions

Sharpen Skills Teacher View: Extend Exploration—Portion Distortion

  • Option for student research into changes in portion sizes over time

Students explore the connections between the food groups and main nutrients.

Vocabulary:

  • macronutrients
  • carbohydrates
  • fiber
  • protein
  • fats
  • umami

Evidence of Student Learning

Students will know:

  • The relationship of food groups and the main nutrients each provides
  • How carbohydrates, proteins and fats work together to provide sustained energy
  • The difference between macro- and micro-nutrients

Students will be able to:

  • Summarize the health benefits of main nutrients
  • Connect specific main nutrients to food groups and empty-calorie foods
  • Identify a potential behavior change related to eating regularly from all food groups
Knowledge Gains

Health Alert: Taste—More than Meets the Tongue with Backstory

  • Describes how “taste” is perceived
  • Reveals inborn preferences that can be changed
  • Compares and contrasts nutrients in foods

Investigate: What Good Is It?

  • Overviews the macronutrients in foods with a focus on the main nutrients

Chart Progress and Chart Progress Teacher View

  • 10-question multiple-choice quiz
Applications

Explore: Self-Survey

  • Prompts personal food and activity logs and guides reflection

Investigate: Move It

  • Understand energy balance of food intake and energy expenditure

Sharpen Skills: What’s Your Advice?

  • Presents a “picky eater” scenario for analysis

Sharpen Skills: Self Survey

  • Apply new learning to food log analysis
Potential Behavior Change

Chart Progress: Change for the Better

  • Students assess the variety of foods they consume daily and strive to eat from all five food groups.
Extensions

Sharpen Skills Teacher View: Extend Exploration—International Eating

  • Option for student research into food-based dietary guidelines from around the world

Students examine commonly under-consumed nutrients and the effects of omitting food groups.

Vocabulary:

  • micronutrient
  • vitamin A
  • vitamin C
  • vitamin D
  • calcium
  • iron
  • potassium

Evidence of Student Learning

Students will know:

  • Which micronutrients are commonly under-consumed and the food groups that are the best sources
  • How omitting food groups from a daily eating plan results in incomplete nutrition and can result in adverse health effects

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze personal consumption to identify under-consumed nutrients
  • Develop strategies to include under-consumed nutrients in the daily eating plan
Knowledge Gains

Health Alert: Would More Milk Do Them Good? with Backstory

  • Relates real-world experience of the effects of nutrients on health
  • Emphasizes the role of nutrients that are especially important for teens
  • Connects under-consumed food groups to under-consumed nutrients

Investigate: Not Just Basketball Players

  • Focuses on the life-long effects of too little calcium during teen years
  • Relates the importance of weight-bearing exercise to bone health

Chart Progress and Chart Progress Teacher View

  • 10-question multiple-choice quiz
Applications

Explore: Self-Survey

  • Prompts personal food and activity logs and guides reflection

Investigate: Not Just Basketball Players—Apply It

  • Apply new learning to food log analysis

Sharpen Skills: What’s Your Advice?

  • Presents a “picky eater” scenario for analysis

Sharpen Skills: You Decide

  • Strategy for students to address the pros and cons of eating from all five food groups
Potential Behavior Change

Chart Progress: Change for the Better

  • Students assess the variety of foods they consume daily and strive to include under-consumed food groups and nutrients.
Extensions

Investigate: On Your Own

  • A National Public Radio interview with a high school female athlete about her nutrition habits

Sharpen Skills Teacher View: Extend Exploration—Supplements

  • Option for student research into the use of supplements

Students generalize about healthy eating patterns and the benefits of eating breakfast.

Vocabulary:

  • breakfast
  • energy

Evidence of Student Learning

Students will know:

  • How carbohydrates, protein and fat work together to provide sustained energy
  • Make generalizations about the benefits of regularly eating a balanced breakfast

Students will be able to:

  • Plan breakfasts that include a balance of carbohydrates, protein and fat
  • Develop strategies to overcome barriers to eating breakfast
  • Identify a potential behavior change related to eating patterns
Knowledge Gains

Health Alert: Connecting Eating and Sleep with Backstory

  • Describes recommended sleep patterns and barriers to doing so
  • Highlights the energy-releasing macro-nutrients and their role in body processes
  • Emphasizes the importance of breakfast

Investigate: Breaking the Fast

  • Focuses on the benefits of breakfast and the sustained energy release from a combination of carbohydrates, proteins and fats
  • Offers a strategy for breakfast that results in sustained energy

Chart Progress and Chart Progress Teacher View

  • 10-question multiple-choice quiz
Applications

Explore: Self-Survey

  • Prompts personal food and activity logs and guides reflection

Investigate: Breaking the Fast—Apply It

  • Apply new learning to food log analysis
  • Coordinate eating and sleeping patterns

Sharpen Skills: What’s Your Advice?

  • Presents a “picky eater” scenario for analysis

Sharpen Skills: You Decide

  • Strategy for students to address the pros and cons of eating breakfast
Potential Behavior Change

Chart Progress: Change for the Better

  • Students assess the variety of foods they consume daily and strive to eat a protein-rich breakfast.
Extensions

Investigate: Move It!

  • A video on how playing sports benefits your body and your brain

Sharpen Skills Teacher View: Extend Exploration—Benefits of Sleep

  • Option for student research into benefits of sleep

Students create a personal nutrition SMART goal.


Evidence of Student Learning

Students will know:

  • How food groups and nutrients relate to healthful eating habits
  • The parts of a SMART goal and how they relate to an actionable plan for nutritious eating

Students will be able to:

  • Compose a SMART goal for improving nutrition
Knowledge Gains

Recap: Show What You Know!

  • Revisit the pre-assessment Nutrition Knowledge

Recap: Small Steps = Big Changes

  • Review of key concepts in unit
Applications

Reflect: Self-Survey

  • Prompts personal analysis and reflection on food and physical activity logs

Reflect: Set Goals SMARTly

  • Offers refreshers on what SMART goals are and how to construct them

Act: SMART Start

  • Develop a SMART goal for one or more aspects of nutrition and physical activity
Potential Behavior Change

SMART goals that reflect Unit objectives:

  • Eating from all five food groups daily
  • Eating an amount of food related to the amount of physical activity
  • Eating a protein-rich breakfast
  • Reaching the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity daily
Extensions

Act Teacher View: Extend Exploration—Nutrition Actions

  • Option to extend nutrition SMART goals to friends, family and school