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12, January 2017 2:22 PM


trade up your breakfast Getting enough sleep during adolescence is a subject gaining attention nationally from the Centers for Disease Control and American Academy of Pediatrics. And Eat Move Win, the new online high school nutrition education program from Dairy Council of California takes the issue head on in an effort to impact teen eating habits, especially at breakfast. 

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and American Academy of Pediatrics, nearly 70 percent of students sleeping seven hours or less on a school night. The recommendation is eight to 10 hours per night. Gone are the peaceful days of sleeping like a baby, teenagers today are more likely to hit snooze until the last possible moment, then race out the door with a second thought for breakfast. The phenomenon is so severe, the organizations actually recommend later start times for high school to better match adolescents' biological clocks. 

Lesson 4 of Eat Move Win addresses the inter-related issues of teen sleep and nutrition through lifestyle habits and eating patterns. While observing the lesson in the classroom, our nutrition staff saw teachers greeted by students carrying sodas and other caffeinated drinks to get them through the morning. Clearly lesson 4 has its work cut out for it! 

Sleep poster rechargeStudies have shown that a morning meal leads to better nutrient intake over the day and fewer calories. Since skipping breakfast and staying up late are associated with late night snacking on low nutrient foods, Eat Move Win lesson 4 focuses on getting adequate sleep and trading up to healthier breakfast food choices to stay energized in the morning.  

Help students make a connection between adequate sleep and time for a healthy breakfastContact the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine for a classroom copy of the  #Sleep Recharges You poster

Hang in the classroom, in the hallway or even in the cafeteria as a visual cue to tie a good night's rest to academic and athletic performance while teaching Eat Move Win. The American Academy Sleep Medicine's website also offers additional resources for educators and professionals concerned with the impact of sleep and stress.

Learn more about the connection between nutrition and sleep, as well as other topics, by teaching Eat Move Win today.



Tags: breakfast Eat Move Win healthy eating patterns high school nutrition education sleep
Categories: categoryNutrition Education

09, January 2017 4:37 PM


Paige Metz awarded Community Health Collaborator Awards When Dairy Council of California (CA) sets out to develop or update a nutrition education program, we look to partners within the education environment to help us review and revise our ideas. For her willingness to share her expertise and advice with partners like Dairy Council of CA and others, Paige Metz (wearing black in photo at right) has been awarded a Community Health Collaborator Award.

As the Health and Physical Education Curriculum Coordinator on the Curriculum and Instruction Team that is part of the College and Career Readiness Unit at the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE), Metz has her fingers on the pulse of education trends and what’s working in real classroom environments. Additionally, Metz has a passion about reinventing physical education (PE) classes as interactive and engaging learning experiences.
 

"It should look like a health and physical education activity lab class," said Metz in a recent SDCOE news release. "There needs to be evidence of cognitive and emotional learning."

Thankfully, Dairy Council of CA Community Nutrition Adviser Heather Troska Berkoben (wearing blue in photo at right) knew Metz’s passion for this kind of change would be important to harness for the development of Eat Move Win, Dairy Council of CA’s first completely online nutrition program for high schools students. 

Go to Fit 2 Learn Website In addition to program development, Metz has been instrumental in promoting Dairy Council of CA programs to her network. She’s included Dairy Council of CA resources and a call for Eat Move Win beta testers in three county-wide emails to physical education (PE) teachers. 

"The reality is, schools just don't have funding to support everything that needs to be funded. That's why having free, good curriculum provided by a community partner, like Dairy Council of CA, is so valuable. Without those resources, students may not get that additional education in important areas like nutrition and physical activity" said Metz. "I appreciate that Dairy Council of CA has been good about updating materials and staying attuned to changes related to nutrition and more globally in education. This keeps the programs robust and engaging for students. I am happy to help collaborate and develop these resources so they are viable and more likely to make a difference in student health and fitness."  

As a leader in promoting best in class education resources, Metz also played a significant role in the development of Fit 2 Learn Fit 4 Life, a website for PE teachers that’s filled with helpful vocabulary resources, classroom lessons, extension activities and other resources to enhance education. 

For her dedication to making nutrition and physical education easier and more accessible to teachers and students alike, Dairy Council of CA is proud to award Paige Metz its Community Collaborator Award.  


 



Tags: Community Health Collaborator Eat Move Win nutrition education partnerships physical activity
Categories: categoryNutrition Education

01, January 2017 9:00 AM


From everyone at Dairy Council of California and HealthyEating.org, best wishes for a healthy, happy New Year celebrated with plenty of family meals!

Pantry Clean Out

Tuna and Walnut Pasta Salad with Hearty Split Pea Soup and Anytime Fruit Shake; plus Last Minute Lasagna, Black Beans and Couscous, Homestyle Green Bean Bake and Alfredo Pasta.

Oatmeal Month

Oat Crusted Chicken with Lemon Dill Yogurt Sauce with Steamed Broccoli and Blueberry Blackberry Gratin; plus Apple Crumble, Slow Cooker Oatmeal, Honey BBQ Meatloaf and Oatmeal Crusted Chicken Tenders.

Healthy Weight Week

Grilled Eye Round Steaks With Wasabi Yogurt Cream and Vietnamese Salad Rolls with Grapefruit With Yogurt Dip; plus Waldorf Salad, Harvest Vegetable Roast, Chicken Noodle Soup and Berry Pancakes.

Try Something New

Kohlrabi and Ham Gratin24K Carrots and Bran Muffin and Fruit Trifle; plus Bierocks (German Meat Turnovers), Crunchy Mandarin Chicken Spinach Salad, Kiwi Lime Frozen Yogurt and Fresh Corn Chowder.

Game Night

Whole Wheat Flatbread with Apples and GorgonzolaWhite Bean and Pesto Dip and Strawberry Orange Cups; plus Red Edge Roll-Ups, Touchdown Taco Salad, Cheesy Bread Twists and Kale + Spinach Chips.

 


Tags: family meals Healthy eating healthy eating for kids healthy eating patterns recipes
Categories: categoryHealthy Eating

20, December 2016 11:21 AM


Heather Berkoben awards Community Health Collaborator Award to Alicia Hauser, RD During the December Staff Meeting in San Diego, CA, Dairy Council of California (CA) took time to recognize its ongoing relationship with Alicia Hauser, RD, Sales Director of Special Projects with Hollandia Dairy, by awarding her the Community Health Collaborator Award for her perfect example of teamwork and community engagement. 

From protecting the role of plain and flavored milk in the school lunch program to supporting educational events like Fuel Up to Play 60 (FUTP60) and summer meals kick off events, Hauser (pictured at right in blue) works closely with Dairy Council of California Community Nutrition Advisor Heather Berkoben (pictured at right in stripes) to protect the health of California’s children. 

Hauser pursed nutrition as a career after being positively influence by a registered dietitian when Hauser was in her 20s. This mentor imparted a solid foundation of nutrition education and healthy eating, which inspired Hauser to capitalize on existing relationship building skills to influence others to be well too.  

“As an RD I consider myself to be an educator,” said Hauser.  “And so, in every position that I’ve held I insert education into my plan.  We’re all selling.  Selling food safety, selling products, selling good nutrition.  I’ve found the partnership with Dairy Council of CA to be a natural and good one as we share a common goal in promoting consumption of dairy for the health and well -being of students.”  

Alicia Hauser, RD and Hollandia Dairy support FUTP60 event at Chula Vista School District Some of her most rewarding experiences involve working with partners to promote healthy eating in the community. Hauser, on behalf of Hollandia Dairy has worked with Dairy Council of CA and other groups to support educational events such as FUTP60 breakfast learning events, Hometown Grant events, Team Nutrition and Smarter Lunchrooms Movement of CA grant kickoff event in San Ysidro and more events like the 2015 Chula Vista School District event (pictured at right) with Hollandia Dairy, FUTP 60, California Milk Advisory Board and others.

Berkoben says of Hauser, “she is more than happy to help and it’s so beneficial having an extra voice that keeps dairy in the conversation.”

In fact, during a recent San Diego County Farm to School Task Force Meeting, Hauser cited the importance of dairy’s role in farm to school, saying, “dairy was the original farm to school product before farm to school was cool.” She also mentioned milk’s short trip from cows to the school cafeteria in about 2 days or less, stressing its freshness and identity as a local food. At a time when milk and dairy foods are often left out of the farm to school conversation, Hauser has been a wonderful advocate for milk. 

When it comes to working with Dairy Council of CA, Hauser says, “My favorite part about working with Dairy Council is working with professionals who share my goals. It’s like we’re workout buddies!”



Tags: Community Health Collaborator farm to school FUTP60 nutrition education partnerships
Categories: categoryNutrition Education

07, December 2016 10:35 AM


Tangled Vines cover In November, our Silicon Valley District Dietetic Association Book Club reviewed Tangled Vines: Greed, Murder, Obsession and an Arsonist in the Vineyards of California by Frances Dinkelspiel. A bit of a diversion from some of our more nutrition focused selections, this book outlines the interesting history of the California wine industry --  a narrative that spans the introduction of wine cultivation by the Franciscan fathers in 1769, planting vines for sacramental wine as they built the missions, to the world-renowned wines produced in California today.

In the early days of the California wine economy, greed spurred more than a few opportunists to fight over fertile land suited for growing grapes, resulting in five murders linked to one of the first vineyards in the state. Closer to present day, the author tells the sordid tale of Mark Anderson, an arsonist who destroyed 4.5 million bottles of California's finest wines stored at Wine Central warehouse in Vallejo, California in 2005. Vintage wines made by the author's great grandfather in 1875 were lost in this fire. The book includes other juicy vignettes of wine embezzlement and fraud.  

As native Californians, we found the book very interesting since it provides a look at California history through the lens of the wine industry: 

  • Large vineyards were first established in southern California and wine making flourished in the region until a disease in 1883 wiped them out.
  • In 1869, Leland Stanford (founder of Stanford University) purchased a  55,000-acre winery, the largest in the world at the time, but struggled financially and the wine wasn't particularly good. His wife sold the vineyard after his death. 
  • The California Wine Association monopolized the wine economy in the 1880s and 1890s, controlling approximately 80 percent of state wine production and sales, until it was put out of business by prohibition.
  • The 1906 Earthquake destroyed 12 - 15 million gallons of wine, making it the most destructive natural disaster ever to impact the industry.
  • The emergence of premium California wine production began in the 1960s when wine industry pioneers like Robert Mondavi promoted a lifestyle that included fine wine and good food.

Wine and Nutrition

You may be wondering, what does this book have to do with food and nutrition? Alcohol is a significant part of human food and nutrition since all food and beverage choices matter. While definitely not an essential part of human nutrition (most nutrition guidelines state if you don't drink, don't start) alcoholic beverages when consumed in moderation can be an enjoyable part of a healthy eating pattern for adults. Moderate drinking is considered up to two drinks/day for a man and one drink/day for a woman.

Most people think of California for its large cities, beaches and mountains. But you may not know that California is the leading US state in cash farm receipts, and a leading producer of wine in the nation.1 The top crops in California are milk, almonds, grapes, cattle, lettuce, strawberries eggs and walnuts. All of this is overseen by the California Department of Food and Agriculture. USDA's MyPlate, MyState provides fascinating information and resources on healthy eating patterns and local agriculture in your own state.

Bottom line

People who are interested in wine and history will very much enjoy this book. It is well written and researched. The author provided a bit more detail than we were interested in regarding her family story, but that is a small negative. We recommend this book and feel confident if these topics interest you, you will find this book a very satisfying read.

Maureen Bligh, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Kristal Shelden, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

References

1. Wine Institute (2015). California Wine Facts & Figures. Retrieved 11.18.2016 from http://www.wineinstitute.org/resources/lifestyleandtravel/article336

 



Tags: Dietitians Book Review healthy eating patterns Maureen Bligh
Categories: categoryNutrition Education

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